Whither Spring?

Whither Spring 3-25-13
Whither Spring 3-25-13

Whither spring? Punxsutawney Phil announced on Twitter February 2 that spring would arrive soon.  Well, it kinda did with some teasing spells of 60 degree highs a couple of weeks ago, but then spring got snatched away again when we woke up to this “wintry mix” on March 25.

Those poor droopy daffodils on Cedar Lane must be so confused.

The first official spring forecast from Gobbler’s knob was made on February 2, 1887. Since then, the Punxsutawney Groundhog has announced his weather prediction around the world each year through newspaper, radio and television coverage, as well as being recorded in the Congressional Record. Now he even has a website and has a Facebook page.

Confused Daffodils on Cedar Lane, 3-25-13
Confused Daffodils on Cedar Lane, 3-25-13

But this year it seems every one is piling on Punxsutawney Phil for getting it wrong. NBC News reports that the Butler County Prosecuting attorney filed court papers this week indicting the world-famous groundhog for “misrepresentation of early spring.”

Those deluded narcissuses probably thought it was safe for them to start developing after having waited all through their winter dormancy being sustained off the stored food reserves in their bulbs.

Gradually, the soil’s moisture and increasing warmth triggered the hardy monocots to push up above the ground those first tentative shoots two weeks ago.

vintage_Easter_eggThey thought it was safe to develop foliage and blooms.  See what it got them.

I will view future Groundhog Day predictions with skepticism and I am definitely hoping that we can place more store in the Easter Bunny.

I heard he will soon deliver a basket of eye-candy for history lovers in the form of several rare real-photo vintage postcard images for Riverton, Moorestown, and Camden.

Sorry, for being a bit dormant myself.  – John McCormick, Gaslight News editor

 

 

One thought on “Whither Spring?”

  1. Rave reviews and kudos to John McCormick, You do an absolutely outstanding job of maintaining and contributing to the Historical Society of Riverton’s website. I just love your writing style and your emphasis on local history, especially through the perspective of authentic post card images and first hand or eyewitness accounts. Keep up the wonderful work. While I no longer reside in the Garden State, I fully appreciate your efforts to keep individuals like myself connected to the history and the past events and personages of South Jersey.

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