Fancy a swim III

RYC 3-mile swim medal, 1919, front and back

In keeping with our “Fancy a swim” theme, this screen capture from an eBay auction (that we didn’t win) shows a medal that the Riverton Yacht Club awarded for a 3-mile women’s swim in 1919.

According to the report in the August 8, 1919 issue of The New Era, “The women’s 3-mile race held by the Yacht Club last Saturday proved to be the greatest race of its kind ever held in the world.”

Despite the writer’s hyperbole, it must have been a pretty awesome event that will probably new be duplicated.

The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 6, 1919, p22

A firing of a cannon from the deck of Commodore R.M. Hollingshead‘s cruiser, a former coast patrol boat, signaled the start of the novel race. (Richard Milton Hollingshead, Sr. founded RM Hollingshead Corporation, and by 1920 it produced 98 Whiz brand automotive products. His son, Richard Hollingshead, Jr., later invented the drive-in movie in 1933. See more details in GN #164, Dec 2016.)

Thirty of the finest women swimmers from New York, Philadelphia, Edgewater Park, and of course, Riverton dove from the deck of the Keystone Yacht Club’s “Surprise” into the “rough and choppy” waters off of the Bridesburg pier and into the record books.

The Journal and Tribune, Knoxville, TN, Sep 4, 1921, p25

Ethelda Bliebtrey, a rising 17-year-old swimming star, won the race with a time of 44 minutes, 15 seconds.

Second place winner Eleanor Uhl that year went on to break Bleibtrey’s record with a time of 43:13 to win the 3-mile swim competition in 1920.

They both were members of the US Women’s Olympic Swim Team in 1920.

The Lake Geneva Regional News, Sept 14, 1922, p5

Billed in the newspapers of the day as an annual 3-mile swim, the Riverton Yacht Club held the event in at least 1918, 1919, 1920, and 1922.

We welcome more information about any particulars regarding Riverton’s 3-mile swim competitions.

 

Riverton’s one-man Polar Bear Club was a world class swimmer

Durborow, Evening Public Ledger, Feb 2, 1920 (1884x1461)Ice boats, an ice auto, and Riverton’s own One-Man Polar Bear Club sure must have made life on the Delaware interesting in February 1920.

Charles Durborow, Distance Swimmer Plunges Into Icy Waters To Keep In Trim Date 1918-02-17 Oregonian
Charles Durborow, Distance Swimmer Plunges Into Icy Waters To Keep In Trim Date 1918-02-17 Oregonian
Keating Kodak ad, New Era, August 14, 1924
Keating Kodak ad, New Era, August 14, 1924

Wouldn’t it be something to find that ice auto under a dusty canvas sitting in a garage on the old Hollingshead property on Thomas Avenue? I’d settle for some home movie footage or even a couple of Kodak snapshots.

With these events happening over ninety years ago, can anyone now possibly have first-hand knowledge of either of the unique ice crafts or the extraordinary athlete pictured here in the icy Delaware River?

I say extraordinary because, evidently, this world-class  swimmer in our own backyard we may never heard of still merits occasional citation when great pioneering amateur distance swim champions are discussed.

Charles B. Durborow, Patriot, March 6, 1920, p19
Charles B. Durborow, Patriot, March 6, 1920, p19

I have come across photos of Charles Durborow before, but clearly I did not take him seriously enough. Newspapers often referred to him simply as a bank clerk, and showed him posing in frigid water clothed in swim trunks and a top, holding a chunk of river ice.

Durborow juggles coin, October 10, 1916, Rockford Morning Star, p9
Durborow juggles coin, October 10, 1916, Rockford Morning Star, p9

One source attributed his conditioning to the development of his arms and shoulders from tossing around heavy sacks of coin in his career as a bank clerk. Further, it claimed that Durborow swam over 600 miles a year, every day of the year, even in winter.

To Riverton citizens and the community of water sports enthusiasts, however, he was much more – Riverton Yacht Club Secretary and Treasurer, Riverton Borough Clerk, Penn Athletic Club founding member, First National Bank of Philadelphia employee for 21 years, independent financial broker, amateur distance swimming champion of national and international renown, Beverly Yacht Club member, and Vice-President Middle Atlantic Association of the Amateur Athletic Union.

As Chairman of the RYC Swimming Committee he managed the annual A.A.U. ten-mile long distance national swimming championship at the Riverton Yacht Club for the years 1918-1922.

He even accompanied Riverton youths as they marked their transition from childhood to young adult by swimming across the Delaware River from the Yacht Club to the Philadelphia side.

Durborow to retire, November 2, 1912, Evening Star, p10
Durborow to retire, November 2, 1912, Evening Star, p10
Swim to Phila, New Era, June 24, 1921, p2
Swim to Phila, New Era, June 24, 1921, p2

He was so frustrated with his failure to complete a crossing of the English Channel in 1912 that he called off a scheduled 34-mile swim from Sandy Hook to Coney Island and said that he “will quit the game for good.”

But he did not quit. The record books bear witness to his incredible swimming stamina and endurance.

Writing in Sporting Life Magazine in 1916, James H. Sterrett called Durborow, “the world’s greatest distance endurance swimmer.” (The private nonprofit LA84 Foundation operates the largest sports research library in North America. Sporting Life is one of many publications archived there.)

Durborow obit, New Era, May 19, 1938, p2
Durborow obit, New Era, May 19, 1938, p2

Writing again for Spaulding’s Athletic Library 1917 publication, How to Swim, Sterrett characterized the 34-year-old, 210 lb. six-foot Philadelphia bank clerk as, “the foremost, long-distance and greatest mileage swimmer in the world.” See a list of Durborow’s accomplishments on p. 40 of How to Swim.

Searching for information about the marathon swimmer is made more difficult by the various ways writers mangled his last name. Durborrow, Durboro, Durburrow, and even Durbonard are some of the erroneous handles given to him by journalists.

One goal that continued to elude him was to swim the English Channel. A 1919 Rockford, IL Register Gazette newspaper article referred to a 1914 forced postponement of an English Channel swim “on account of the European squabble.” A planned crossing in 1919 was to be Durborow’s second attempt, according to the story, but he did not prove successful as his name is not on the list of swimmers who mastered the Channel.

Christ Church and Rectory
Christ Church and Rectory

The Durborow family later moved to Edgewater Park after residing in Riverton from about 1907-1927. Mr. Durborow’s 1938 New York Times obituary explained that he passed away suddenly at age 56. Funeral services were held Riverton’s Christ Episcopal Church.

Long distance open water swimming still draws participants and fans. A Sept. 2013 National Geographic Daily News article, Greatest Swims: Five Epic Swims in the Wake of Nyad’s Feat, reminds us about Diana Nyad, the 64-year-old woman who became the first person ever to swim between Cuba and Florida unassisted by a shark cage. She accomplished the feat in just 52 hours, 54 minutes, and 18 seconds.

In that article, take note of Gertrude Ederle, the American swimming sensation who conquered the English Channel in 1926. Her experiences as a 15-year-old entrant in competitions at Riverton Yacht Club, among other places, helped hone her distance swimming skills.

As always, we welcome comments from anyone who can shed more light on this subject, and are open to suggestions for other overlooked Riverton characters. – John McCormick